New Zealand

New Zealand is one of the most photogenic places in the world. Even its Maori name, Aotearoa, the land of the long white cloud, sounds mystical and picturesque.

New Zealand is an island country situated only 1,500 kilometres east of Australia in the South-western region of the Pacific Ocean. It is divided into two main masses, the North and South Island, with numerous smaller islands dotted in-between. Due to its remoteness it is considered to be one of the last lands to be settled by man.

The ancient Polynesians settled New Zealand around 1250 CE and developed a uniquely Maori culture still prominent in today's society. During its long isolation New Zealand developed some very distinctive and unique plant and animal life, most notable are probably the unique species of flightless birds, such as the Kiwi.

New Zealand is home to a gorgeous variety of landscapes, from sharp mountain peaks to wide grassy plains. You can catch some perfect uncrowded waves in the morning and be skiing the slops in the afternoon. This varying topography played its part in crowning New Zealand the adventure sport capital of the world. From zorbing and white water rafting to sky diving and bungee jumping, New Zealand while keep your adrenaline pumping until you fly home.

Surf regions in New Zealand include...

Weather in New Zealand

New Zealand has a mild and pleasant climate with an average temperate of 10°C in the South and 16°C in the North. Sitting straight in the path of the Roaring Forties, New Zealand is freshened by the cool winds from the Tasman Sea.

Weather conditions can vary quite sharply across regions, from extremely wet on the South Island to subtropical in the very North. The Southern Alps and volcanos on the North Island act as a barrier from these moist winds keeping the east coast dry and creating a wet climate on the west. This is more pronounced on the South Island, as the northern volcanos aren't as large as the Alps.

If you are looking for outdoor adventures then the warmer months (November to April) are for you. Summer is the time of the food and wine festivals and all the large sporting events.

However, if it's the open slopes and powder runs you're after then head there between June and August. The snow season is generally from June to early October on the South Island and if you're lucky it may snow on the North Island.

North Island Pacific

North Island Pacific

For many people, the North Island conjures images of family holidays, frolicking in the sun and the beautiful bays of the Pacific Ocean.

North Island Tasman

North Island Tasman

North Islands Tasman beaches have a special magnetic force drawing people in and there are many to choose from. The quiet and sheltered, the busy and bustling, large or small, or those completely surf orientated.

South Island Pacific

South Island Pacific

Also known by the local Maoris as Te Wai Pounamu or Water of Greenstone, the South Island of New Zealand is 151,215 square kilometres of spectacular scenery. Ranking as the 12th largest island in the world, its incredible diversity of landscape showcases nature at its best.

South Island Tasman

South Island Tasman

The west coast is lined by the Southern Alps mountain ranges, spectacular in scenery with massive glaciers and limestone landscapes, lakes and rivers and lush rainforest. Often called the Sightseeing and Walking Capital of the world.

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